Kusamono, Jasmine and Kitchen-Scrap Bonsai

My wife is an avid gardener. She tends to away from bonsai (most of the time). To quote her words: “I let my husband works on big trees, I stick to the small stuffs like kusamono and anything palm-size.” Here are some of her small stuffs:

She might not call this flowering jasmine a bonsai, but to me it is a bunjin shohin. The fragrance filled our kitchen when she brought it indoors.
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This cabbage is a kitchen left-over. After stripping off all the leaves for food, she planted the stem in a cup filled with expanded shale and water. It rooted and grew into a small cabbage ball with curly leaves. Eventually the regrown cabbage will be eaten, and perhaps the stem will be regrown. She has other kitchen left overs, such as potato eye, yam, onion etc., grown into what I called, kitchen-scrap bonsai.

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Grown from a potato eye.

A friend gave us this lace rock. She planted a mixture of herbaceous plants and garden weeds on it.  You can call it a kusamono, but when she arranged this rock planting on a suiban, and with a little boatman rowing into the cave, it is a saikei or a landscape penjing.

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When the same rock plant is placed on a suiban, tilted at a different angle, and decorated with a boatman, it becomes a saikei.  Photo taken May 2014.

More of her little stuffs:

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She sells sea shells on the sea shore.

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Her miniature rose. She always keep only one bloom on this mame.

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A garden weed.

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Chrysanthemum in a broken pot.

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4 thoughts on “Kusamono, Jasmine and Kitchen-Scrap Bonsai

  1. I would love to see more pictures on the cabbage, too! I have a purple cabbage, in water, on the window still with lots of roots but not so much new leafy growth.

    • Thanks. My wife had taken some photos on how she made the potted cabbage. I will post them in my facebook since I cannot attach photos in the reply. She leaves a few very small or undeveloped leaves at the base.

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