The Artisans Cup Bonsai Show

My wife and I went to the Artisans Cup bonsai show in Portland, Oregon. It is a fantastic show with superb bonsai. The Saturday morning opening was packed with people. The hall was basically unlit, except flood lights aiming directly at the trees.

There were over 70 displays, heavy on conifers, especially American west and northwest species such as California Juniper, Pondorosa Pine, Sierra Juniper, Mountain Hemlock etc. These collected trees are huge, and with a lot of jins and shari.

Here are some of the photos I took with my point-and-shoot camera:

IMG_0983

IMG_1175

First Prize Tree: Rocky Mountain Juniper (Juniperus scopulorum) from Randy Knight, estimated age 650 years old, trained for 5 years.

IMG_1177

Details of the shari, the dead branch hung out the pot.

IMG_1165

South Western White Pine ( Pinus strobiformis) from Greg Breden. Estimated age: 300+ years old, trained for 10 years, in a Ron Lang cascade pot.

IMG_1166

I love the way the root hung onto the pot, a very beautiful and masculine pot.

IMG_0972

Mountain Hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana) from Dan Robinson. Estimated age: 500 years old, trained 23 years. See Dan’s book on “Gnarly Branches, Ancient Trees” for stories behind his collections. I saw this tree when I visited Dan’s Elandon Garden last year.

IMG_0975

I like the mushroom among the moss, one would see similar mushrooms in Canadian wilderness where mountain hemlock grows.

IMG_0459

These mushrooms grow along the river bank of the Shannon Falls, near Squamish, British Columbia. I also saw several bonsai quality wild mountain hemlocks in the area; that would be another post for the future.

IMG_0960

California Juniper (Juniperus californica) from Seiji Shiba. Estimated age: 1000-1600 years old, trained for 15 years.

IMG_0962

Details of the shari and root base.

IMG_1101

California Juniper (Juniperus californica) from Eric Shrader. This juniper was grafted with “kishu” shimpaku (Juniperus chinensis) to get a finer foliage. Estimated age: 100 years old, trained 10 years, in an antique Chinese pot.

IMG_1113

Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) from the Rocky Mountains by Doug Paul. Estimated age: 800 years old, trained 5 years.

IMG_1117

IMG_0946

Second prize winning tree. A Sierra Juniper (Juniperus occidentalis var. australis) from Tim Priest. Collected from the Sierra Nevada Mountains, California. Estimated age: 300 years old, trained for 5 years.

IMG_0968

Third prize tree, A Rocfky Mountain Juniper (Juniperus scopulerum) from Amy Blanton. Estimated age: 450 years old, trained 4 years.

IMG_1002

Bald Cypress (Taxodium distichum) from John Wall. Estimated age: 40-50 years old, trained 5 years. Collected in Tennessee.

IMG_1004

The top part of the main trunk has beaver mark.

IMG_0940-001

Mountain Hemlock (Tsuga martebsiana) from Anthony Fajarillo. Estimated age: 300-350 years old, trained for 8-10 years. Origin: Vancouver Island.

IMG_1064

A defoliated Japanese Beach (Fagus crenata ‘Fuji’) from the Pacific Bonsai Museum. I had featured this tree in my previous post on the museum’s collections. Esitmated age: 60 years old, trained 57 years.

IMG_1081

Buttonwood (Conorcarpus erectus) from Michael Feduccia. Estimated age: 150-200 years old, trained for 5 years.

IMG_1039

Japanese Maple (Acer palmatum ‘Shishigashira” from William Valvanis. Estimated age: 51 years old, trained for 46 years.

It is interesting to note that the three winning trees, though have great age, were trained for only 4-5 years. The broad leave Japanese Beech and Maple had been trained for nearly half a century.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “The Artisans Cup Bonsai Show

  1. Pingback: Bonsai, Kusamono and Companion Displays that I like at the Artisans Cup | Bonsai Penjing & More

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s